Hospice of Kodiak is a fully licensed hospice agency by the State of Alaska.  

 

Our Mission

To join the journey of those facing life-threatening illness or loss; meeting needs; reducing fears; offering comfort.

 

Hospice offers non medical direct, indirect, and general support to families facing serious illness, death and bereavement.

Here’s the story of our roots:

Hospice and Palliative Care of Kodiak began as a grass roots non-profit organization in 2011 with the dreams of a dedicated group of Kodiak citizens who saw a need in our community for individuals experiencing an end of life diagnosis. Fair Wind Players presented the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama "Wit", under the direction of Jenny Stevens in October 2010. Following each performance, the cast invited the audience to stay and talk about the play. Kathy Nussbaum, RN with a Hospice background, attended one of those performances and discussions and it was there that she decided to start a hospice in Kodiak. With the help of Dr. Jen Webster, they advertised a community meeting to discuss the need, and by the end of the first meeting, the gap was apparent and the work began to start a volunteer hospice. It took two years from that first meeting, and a lot of help from the board secretary, Alan Schmitt, and the other board members before the paperwork was completed and we were ready to deliver volunteer services. The founders envisioned an organization that would be well known for the help they could offer families facing serious illness, death and bereavement. Neighbors helping neighbors with needs ranging from catching fresh fish for dinner, to running errands, to offering companionship or respite care, to being a listener during the long road of bereavement.

In 2013 Hospice of Kodiak began serving its first clients. Hospice of Kodiak relies greatly on community involvement and support. The Hospice Board of Directors oversees the management of the organization. In addition, there are two paid staff; a full time director and a full time volunteer coordinator, who with a team of many volunteers provide direct hospice and bereavement services to patients, family and community members.


In the end, people don’t view their life as merely the average of all its moments—which, after all, is mostly nothing much plus some sleep. For human beings, life is meaningful because it is a story. A story has a sense of a whole, and its arc is determined by the significant moments, the ones where something happens. Measurements of people’s minute-by-minute levels of pleasure and pain miss this fundamental aspect of human existence. A seemingly happy life maybe empty. A seemingly difficult life may be devoted to a great cause. We have purposes larger than ourselves.”
— Atul Gwande, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End